Moran Cerf

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Moran Cerf is a neuroscientist studying how conscious percepts are formed in our brains. He records the activity of individual nerve cells directly from the brains of patients undergoing neurosurgery. These patients are implanted with electrodes deep inside their brains for clinical purposes. Following the implantation, Cerf is able to use the implanted electrodes to study the ways by which thoughts and memories are registered. In his work, Cerf has shown the ability to project patients' thoughts onto a screen in front of their eyes by reading the activity of cells within their brain. His current studies show how patients are able to use the feedback from the electrodes in their brain to regulate their own emotions and to alter their decisions as they occur. Additionally, the patients are able to activate and communicate their thoughts externally and operate devices by sheer conscious thoughts. This research sheds light on the mechanisms that are involved in thinking or imagining a concept in our own mind, and the ways by which we ponder upon memories.
  • Speaker PopTech 2012
  • Faculty 2013 Social Innovation Fellows
  • Faculty 2013 Science Fellows
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Archived blog posts

Moran Cerf: from hacking into banks to hacking into brains

Moran Cerf: from hacking into banks to hacking into brains

 

Moran Cerf’s career as a neuroscientist began at a computer keyboard. Years ago he was hacker. That unusual career arc actually makes sense once you understand what makes Cerf (PopTech 2012) tick.

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New speakers added to PopTech Camden lineup!

New speakers added to PopTech Camden lineup!

PopTech is thrilled to announce a new round of speakers added to this year’s convening in Camden, Maine. New presenters include a civil rights leader and public health advocate, an epidemiologist who studies how traumatic events alter population health, and a former bank-thief-turned-neuroscientist who has shown how to project patients’ thoughts onto a screen in front of their eyes by implanting electrodes deep inside their brains.Read more »