Peter Kareiva

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Peter Kareiva is the chief scientist and vice president of the Nature Conservancy, where he oversees over 600 staff engaged in conservation science in over 30 countries around the world. His current research concerns the connection between human activities and changes in ecosystem services, as part of the Natural Capital Project. Kareiva is also studying the linkage between the sustainability initiatives of global corporations and their impacts on ecosystems as well as their own corporate performance. In the past Kareiva has published on biotechnology, agriculture, risk assessment, climate change, invasive species, and the importance of getting our children into nature. Kareiva received bachelors degrees in political science and zoology from Duke University,and his doctorate in ecology and applied mathematics from Cornell University. He is the author of more than 150 scientific publications and author or editor of eight books, including a textbook on conservation science. Kareiva is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of The National Academy of Sciences. Prior to joining The Nature Conservancy, Kareiva was the Director of Conservation Biology at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center, and prior to that he was a professor at University of Washington and Brown University, with teaching or faculty stints at Stanford University, University of Virginia, Uppsala University, and Oxford University. He currently lives in Seattle, Washington.
  • Speaker PopTech 2012

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New speakers added to PopTech Camden lineup!

New speakers added to PopTech Camden lineup!

PopTech is thrilled to announce a new round of speakers added to this year’s convening in Camden, Maine. New presenters include a civil rights leader and public health advocate, an epidemiologist who studies how traumatic events alter population health, and a former bank-thief-turned-neuroscientist who has shown how to project patients’ thoughts onto a screen in front of their eyes by implanting electrodes deep inside their brains.Read more »